Johns Manville Insulation

For more than 150 years, Johns Manville has focused on developing materials to make diverse environments stronger, more durable, and more energy efficient and comfortable.

There are a number of insulation choices for every part of your home—each with different advantages and benefits. Johns Manville home insulation products offer you superior quality and safety to help improve the energy efficiency and comfort of your home. Regardless of where you start insulating (attic, basement, etc.), JM has insulation choices to match your needs and budget.

WHICH INSULATION DO YOU NEED?
Before the you begin, you need to verify the size of the cavities the insulation will be applied (generally 16” or 24”) and calculate how much is needed.

WHERE SHOULD YOU INSULATE?
Ideally the whole home should be insulated from attic to the crawl space. Having the proper insulation and gap sealing in all areas will dramatically improve the energy efficiency of the home. Common insulation projects include attics, crawl spaces, exterior and interior walls, basements and ceilings.

WHAT IS FACING?
Either Kraft paper or plastic that is attached to the insulation to help control moisture, mold and draft.

DO YOU NEED A VAPOR RETARDER?
Vapor retarders are typically recommended for the interior side (i.e., the “warm in winter” side) of above-ground framed walls in your home such as bedrooms, bathrooms, garages and attics. A vapor retarder is not required for basement walls, walls made of materials that can’t be damaged by moisture or freezing, or any parts of walls that are below ground.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU NEED TO INSULATE?
Tape Measure for measuring insulation
Straightedge (yardstick or 2 x 4) for cutting insulation
Utility Knife for cutting insulation
Stapling Tool for attaching faced insulation or vapor barrier to framing and studs
Putty Knife or screw driver for forcing pieces of insulation into small places
Caulking gun & Caulk to seal floored ceiling plates and other gaps through which air may flow
Dusk Mask to minimize any irritation from breathing airborne particles
Safety Glasses or Goggles to protect eyes from airborne particles or other potential hazards
Long pants, long shirts and gloves to help minimize skin contact with insulation and insulation dust

WHAT IS R-VALUE?
R means resistance to heat flow. The higher the R-Value, the greater the insulating power. As R-Value increases, so does energy efficiency and home comfort. The colder, or warmer, the climate, the higher R-Value needed to maintain energy efficiency and comfort.

R-VALUE RECOMMENDATIONS
Depending on where you live and the part of your home you’re insulating (walls, crawl space, attic, etc.), you’ll need a different R-value. Typical recommendations for exterior walls are R-13 to R-23, while R-30, R-38 and R-49 are common for ceilings and attic spaces. See the Department of Energy’s (DOE) ranges for recommended levels of insulation below.

AREA OF HOME GOOD BETTER BEST
Attics R-30 R-38 R-49
Cathedral Ceilings R-19 R-30 R-38
2×4 Walls R-13 n/a R-15
2×6 Walls R-19  n/a R-21
Floors R-19 R-25 R-30
Crawl Spaces R-19 R-25 R-30
Basement Walls R-11 R-13 R-15

Printable JM INSULATION GUIDE